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DID A REGIMENT REALLY VANISH AT GALLIPOLI ?

by John Pinkney


Something exceedingly strange happened at Gallipoli, the scene of Australia's most celebrated battle. Or so the believers insist ....

The uncanny incident allegedly occurred on 28 August 1915 - and was witnessed by the 22 members of the New Zealand Engineers Number One Field Company. Three of the men, Sappers F. Eichardt, J. Newman and R. Newnes, swore an affidavit describing what they claimed to have seen.

They wrote ...

The incident happened ... in the morning, during the final days of the fighting at Hill 60, Suvla Bay.

The day broke clear as any beautiful Mediterranean day could be expected to be. The exception was six or eight loaf-of-bread-shaped clouds, all exactly alike, hovering over Hill 60. Despite a four-to-five mile an hour breeze, these clouds did not drift away.

Also stationary, and resting on the ground underneath these clouds, was a similar cloud. It was grey and almost solid-looking, straddling a dry creek bed.

A British regiment, the First Fourth Norfolk, was then seen marching up the creek bed towards Hill 60. When they arrived at the cloud, they marched straight into it, without hesitation. After the last of the file had disappeared into it, this cloud very unobtrusively lifted off the ground, and, as any fog or cloud would, rose until it joined the other clouds.

At this time, the group of clouds had been hovering in one place, but as soon as the 'ground' cloud had risen to their level, they all moved away northward towards Thrace (Bulgaria). In 45 minutes they had all disappeared from view.

When Turkey surrendered in 1918 Britain (assuming the missing regimental members had been taken prisoner) demanded they be returned. However the Turks insisted that they knew nothing about the men.

This claim was supported by the New Zealand witnesses, who wrote: "Those who observed the incident vouch for the fact that Turkey never captured that regiment, nor made contact with it.'

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